The use of SSRIs by pregnant women in a state of depression affect fetal brain circuitry and can result in behavioral changes later in life.

Lynette Espino  Introduction: Serotonin (SERT) plays a role in fetal brain development and mood regulation later in life.1 The use of Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs) increases anxiety and depression in mice exposed to SSRIs during an early postnatal period.1-4 However, children of women who experienced depression during pregnancy also…
Neuroscience Reproduction

Preferential inhibition of the neonatal μ receptor and CREB-regulated nuclear transcription as a mechanism of treatment of opioid-dependence during pregnancy

Keirsyn Criss Introduction. Exogenous opioids target the μ receptor which is a G-protein coupled receptor, stimulating the production of cAMP. Overuse and opioid addiction has been on the rise in recent years, with the advent of the “opioid crisis”.5-8 Maternal use of opioids during pregnancy has become a recent concern, and…
Reproduction

The Role of Extracellular Vesicles in the Pathogenesis of Preeclampsia

Jennifer Rogers Introduction. Preeclampsia (PE), a hypercoagulable pregnancy disorder that involves multiple organs, is a leading cause of maternal and fetal mortality.1,2 PE is characterized by hypertension presenting after 20 weeks gestation, along with other symptoms, including proteinuria, thrombocytopenia, edema, and cerebral or visual changes.1,2 If PE remains untreated, it…
Featured Abstracts Reproduction

Inflammation and stress in preeclampsia due to microparticles of the endothelium and the trophoblast

Laura Chahin Introduction – The maternal condition preeclampsia currently has an incidence of 3-5%1 and affects both neonates and mothers globally as the most common cause of mortality2. Preeclampsia can be identified beginning at 20 weeks gestation by hypertension, protein present in urine, and, most concerning, damage to additional organs1.…
Featured Abstracts Reproduction